Dietary fibre is the indigestible portion of food derived from plants. There are two different types of fibre - soluble and insoluble. Both types of fibre help your body in different ways so should be included in a normal healthy diet. Eating wholegrain cereals and plenty of fruit and vegetables helps to ensure both adults and children are eating enough fibre.

 

Soluble fibre dissolves in the water in your digestive system. It can help to delay gastric emptying and result in an extended feeling of fullness. It may also help to reduce the amount of cholesterol in your blood. If you have constipation, gradually increasing sources of soluble fibre can help soften your stools and make them easier to pass. Foods that contain soluble fibre include:

     

      oats,

      barley,

      rye fruit (bananas and apples),

      root vegetables (carrots and potatoes),

      golden linseeds.

 

 

 

Insoluble fibre doesn't dissolve in water. It passes through your gut without being broken down. This helps other foods move through your digestive system more easily. Insoluble fibre keeps your bowels healthy and helps prevent digestive problems. If you have diarrhoea, you should limit the amount of insoluble fibre in your diet. Good sources of insoluble fibre include:

 

      wholemeal bread,

      bran cereals,

      nuts and seeds.

 

Fibre is important as part of a healthy diet. It can help prevent heart disease, diabetes, weight gain and some cancers, and can also improve digestive health. Adults need approximately 30g of fibre daily. Foods that are high in fibre can help us feel mg fuller longer. This can help prevent excessive eating or smacking and is particularly helpful for someone trying to lose weight. A slow, steady increase in fibre intake is advised and individuals should be encouraged to drink plenty of water as well.

 

 

 

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